Blue and White.

Another quite changeable day. Breezy with lots of sun and some huge downpours. The plants are lapping it up and I am sent scuttling to the shed. On my rounds this morning this greeted me.

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My resent purchase from Grey’s Court National Trust. Iris ‘Bold Print’, a perfect addition to the White Garden. Also flowering or putting on a show there are the following…

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Phlox Divaricata ‘White Perfume’  I bought this from Elizabeth MacGregor . I have been buying from her nursery for around 10 years. She has a lovely selection of plants, with a personal service. This phlox is very early and has a really strong perfume.

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Another Plant World Seeds find, Galatites Tomentosa Alba. Not a looker of a flower but I like the foliage.

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Another foliage plant the Hedgehog Holly. Quite slow growing and lethal when you are weeding around it.

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Variegated Soloman’s Seal, always looks a little twisted as it’s growing but sits nicely among the bluebells.

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Elizabeth MacGregor triumphs again Vancouveria Hexandra. At the moment I love this delicate looking plant but somebody in America may put me wise. A gentle ground cover is how it is sold. I have planted it on a pile of rotting logs in the White Garden, slightly shady and moist. It had better stay put and not wander too far.

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Common as Cornflowers are, this is a bit different. It has not seeded ever and has never travelled. I may lift and split it this year as it has sat in this position for about 8 years. The name and label disappeared many years ago.

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And to finish an Auricla not in the garden but in a pot, Auricula Joanna.

 

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18 Comments

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18 responses to “Blue and White.

  1. Everything is looking lovely. 🙂 I’ve never seen Galatites Tomentosa Alba but it is beautiful.

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  2. It is so exciting this month, every day when you do your rounds there is something new to look at. That is a lovely Iris and I love your Phlox. Vancouveria is is new to me, it is very pretty.

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  3. Another beauty parade Sue! I am especially taken with the Vancouveria and intrigued (and a little bit scared) by the galatites.

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  4. Just to echo your comments about Elizabeth McGregor’s nursery. I’ve been buying plants from her for about the same period of time Sue and have never been disappointed. A brilliant selection of plants, excellent quality and packaging. Now why didn’t I notice the Vancouveria Hexandra? It looks most attractive. Maybe next year …. 🙂

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    • Well, I think it was because it was on their extra list on line. I had an email just before I ordered and saw it, thought I would take a chance. It is lovely isn’t it ? Quite agree, she never fails.

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  5. This nursery sounds brilliant – highly recommended by bloggers! I love the plain white ‘cornflower’ – does it establish as well as the usual blues? And downpowers?! Now I know we must be in our own microclimate here – the forecast has been for dampness off and on all week, but today is the first proper rain and we are not that far from you…

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  6. diversifolius

    All lovely! I love Vancouveria (maybe because it’s a relative of Epimediums), anyway don’t worry, I have one in dry shade and it stays really ‘quiet’ but with more moisture would form a nice clump, nothing invasive.

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  7. Your white garden is beautiful! I chuckled over your Vancouveria…..I’m sure it will give you a run for your money! Happy gardening.

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  8. Hedgehog Holly is aptly named! Your blue and white iris is beautiful. I like Phlox divaritica also but the rabbits here always make a meal of it, also it tends to go dormant during our hot summers, so I don’t plant it any more.

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  9. Deborah Banks

    I have had Vancouveria for 9 or 10 years. It spreads somewhat faster than epimediums, but not bad. Be warned though; it makes a dense root mass – not deep, just thick. Good for suppressing weeds and it’s simple enough to dig out part of it when it’s on its own. But let it weave in among your treasured little plants and you’ll never separate them from it except in pieces.

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